Teachers’ Tips: Speaking/ Discussion

To speak a foreign language fluently — that’s every language learner’s dream. Whilst self-expression through speaking comes almost naturally to us, conveying meaning, especially in a context and a different language could make us feel like a fish out of water.

For the last part of  Teachers’ Tips, Monol teachers share what they think are efficacious ways to be a step better (or more!) in speaking and discussion. Read on:

“Organize your thoughts or ideas when talking about a certain topic.”
-Teacher Jesheamor

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source: 68.media.tumblr.com

Imagine this situation: You are to talk about a recurring debate, let’s say privacy vs. surveillance. Having an idea about a topic is one, but being able to properly organize these ideas and eloquently deliver main points is another thing. Whether it’s IELTS or TOEIC speaking, or even just a run-of-the-mill conversation, it is highly encouraged to organize your thoughts to make sense of your opinion. Focus on the topic and formulate subtopics. Start the discussion with introduction, body, and conclusion.

“Study with other nationalities.”
-Teacher Geralyn

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source:  fthmb.tqn.com

When asked about why students come here to study English, one of the most common answers is, “To talk to foreigners“. Well, the purpose could be the process at same time. Engaging in a conversation with other nationalities is consequently one of the best applications of all the hours spent inside the classroom. In Monol, there are diverse nationalities that you can make friends with – Taiwanese, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Arabs, Monogolian, Japanese, and of course, Filipinos.

“Share opinion with people.”
-Teacher Areya

Engaging in a healthy discussion is a good way to get exposed to different perspectives. This is one good way to practice expressing abstract ideas and emotions. In addition, it can show us the other side of the world that we haven’t seen before. With the help of organized thoughts and ideas, you might just inspire or open the mind of other people.

“Do not be preoccupied with grammar.”
-Teacher Rolando

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Accuracy or fluency? More often than not, students are well-aware of grammar technicalities and get too preoccupied with it that it affects the next 10 seconds of what could have been a chance to speak and be able to learn from a mistake, if so. People have different takes on this, but an efficient one would be: Just speak and learn in the process.

“Study vocabs and try using them in daily conversations.”
-Teacher Marria

What’s the good of learning a dozen of vocabularies a day if you’re not going to use them? Pick words that you would want to use in a day and use it while talking to at least three people. You’ll be surprised how easily you can memorize these words.

Bonus: Listen. Conversation is a two way process. Avoid communication traffic by letting other person speak without interruption.

**featured image from http://www.quickanddirtytips.com

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Teachers’ Tips: LISTENING

What?
Can you please say it again?
Sorry, I wasn’t able to catch that.

Sounds familiar?

Listening takes a lot of effort than it appears especially for language learners. It is not only about hearing what another person is saying, it’s more about processing the sound transmitted from a medium to our brains. Making sense of what you have heard is a challenge especially when you’re unfamiliar with the words uttered to you. In addition, there exists numerous accents all over the world which means different pronunciations and diction.

This is why we compiled some helpful tips straight from the people who knows best when it comes to this facet — teachers. And here’s what they’ve got to say:

“Listen to English songs and try to write their lyrics.”
-Teacher Jesheamor

There are countless genres that would suit each and every person in the world. Pick one that interests you and try to play it, pause, and scribe. Repeat the process and check your performance by searching for the lyrics on the internet.

“Record class activities.”
-Teacher Tom

Here’s the thing: when you are in class, you probably can’t turn your 100% attention on what the teacher is telling you maybe because of some external factors or because you are multitasking- – writing, listening, and even talking at the same time. The good thing about this strategy is, you can replay the audio during your self study time and be able to focus on the content in your own sweet time.

“Have a list of words to listen to.”
-Teacher Tom

Having a list of words could help in expanding your vocabulary, therefore training your mind to be accustomed to the words that you don’t usually hear around you. Familiarity is the key.

“Engage in meaningful conversation with your friends.”
-Teacher Areya

Engaging in a meaningful conversation with your friends is a viable way to develop listening skills. The more diverse your circle is, the better chances of being accustomed to different accents and speech rate.

“Watch English movies.”
-Teacher Geralyn

This is probably the most entertaining way of practicing your listening skill. Watching a movie is like being in the real situation, seeing gestures, lip movements, and all the possible real-life situation all in a screen. Plus, you can take home a lot of practical expressions!

*featured image from https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com