Baguio chosen as Philippines’ First UNESCO Creative City

Baguio is Philippines’ First UNESCO Creative City

baguio-blog1

In a  press statement, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) said that the “Summer Capital of the Philippines” is one of 64 cities worldwide to be included in the Creative Cities Network.

Baguio City is included in the crafts and folk art field.

The UNESCO Creative Cities has highlighted its members’ creativity within 7 fields: crafts and folk art, design, film, gastronomy, literature, media arts and music.

From UNESCO, “The Creative Cities will join a Network at the frontline of UNESCO’s efforts to foster innovation and creativity as key drivers for a more sustainable and inclusive urban development.”

UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is one the agencies of the UN (United Nations).

Cordillera Tourism Director Maria Venus Tan, who was instrumental in Baguio’s campaign, wrote on Facebook, “I woke up today with the happiest news that Bagio has been declared as one of the new UNESCO Creative Cities in its network!”

Baguio, the gateway to the Cordilleras, was created as a hill station by the Americans more than a hundred years ago. The famous architect and urban planner Daniel Burnham set up the blueprint for the city, which was declared as the Summer Capital of the Philippines in 1909.

 

Crafts and Folk Art in Baguio

bdf

National Artist for Visual Arts Benedicto “BenCab” Cabrera  Eric “Kidlat Tahimik” de Guia.

Benedicto Reyes Cabrera — or BenCab, as he is more popularly known is widely hailed as a master of contemporary Philippine art. The artist lives and works in Baguio City.

One of the most prominent names in the Filipino film industry, Eric “Kidlat Tahimik” de Guia has garnered various accolades locally and internationally, including a Plaridel honorarium for Independent Cinema. He is dubbed by fellow filmmakers and critics as the “Father of Philippine Independent Cinema.

 2

Cordilleran art of weaving has fascinated local and foreign tourists who visit the region

The local woven clothes are an instant hit among tourists, who purchase them as souvenir items. The purchase provides supplementary earnings to local weavers of the Cordilleras.

Nardas is a popular store started by Bontoc weaver Narda Capuyan, this flagship store carries a broad selection of high-quality, locally made items

Another place to visit is the Easter Weaving Room if you are interested in native fabrics and other handicraft. Here one can witness the actual process of cloth weaving as practiced by the natives of the mountain provinces for ages.

2333.jpg

Handicraft Souvenirs

The City of Baguio is one of the best places to buy souvenir for your families back home or souvenirs like wood carvings such as “Barrel Man”.

Notable handicraft items, which are often sold as souvenir items, include hand weaving, wood carving and metalcraft.

Souvenir shopping is one of the most awaited part of every traveler when on a trip or vacation. Everyone wants to share what they seen and experience during their travels.

Souvenirs vary from the local delicacies found only in the place that you are visiting or their specialty products such as bags, clothes, footwear and souvenir items like key chain, ref magnets, mats, bags and others.

2

Ifugao Woodcarvers’ Village

The Ifugao Wood Carvers’ Village or Itogon Wood Carvers’ Village is a tourist site in Baguio where workshops of Ifugao wood carvers can be found. High quality wood carvings of various types and sizes are sold at the village, usually at considerably lower prices than elsewhere in Baguio.

A few kilometers away from in Baguio. Off the beaten path of the usual Burnham downtown crowds. The street is lined with woodcarving stores with some being carved on the spot. Wood carved products are 80% cheaper than that found in Manila or the stores in malls. It is worth the visit and shopping!

Items made from real Kamagong wood, Anahaw, or Molave.

maxresdefault

Igorot Culture

Igorot, or Cordillerans, is the collective name of several ethnic groups in the Philippines, who inhabit the mountains of Luzon.

Cultural elements common to the Igorot peoples as a whole include wood carving, weaving, metalworking, and rituals. The rich culture of the Igorot’s are what influences the design, materials, and practices of most arts and crafts in the city of Baguio.

The subjects of the carvings vary widely but are mostly motifs closely associated with the Cordilleras, such as bul’ul or indigenous people and animals.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s